Youth Outreach Resource Hub: Crisis Pregnancy

 

I think I'm pregnant. What do I do?

If you think you might be pregnant, it's important to know that your life WILL go on. We or any organization we refer you to will provide services that will help you make healthy choices that will help keep you on track for all of your future plans. You are not alone. We're here for you—all you need to do is follow these steps!

     1. Make sure you are pregnant.

The best first step to take is to get a free, medical-grade pregnancy test from the Women's Care Center. This organization has locations in ten states and is committed to helping you through every step of your journey, whatever comes next. Click here to find a Women's Care Center near you! Walk-ins are always welcome, or you can call 1(877) 908-2341 to schedule an appointment. All resources are free and completely confidential.​ 

If you need help getting to the Women's Care Center, feel free to call our office at (574) 232-5433 or email us at life@prolifemichiana.org so we can help you find a way to get to a center near you.

​​If you can't find a Women's Care Center near you, you can still call their hotline at 1(877) 908-2341 to speak to a counselor remotely and get information on another pregnancy resource center that can provide the care you need. Alternatively, you can contact the Women's Care Center via email.​

     2. Talk with a counselor.
 

If your Women's Care Center pregnancy test confirmed that you were pregnant, you may not know what to do next. First, congratulations! You're a mom, and we know that you are strong enough to face anything that life throws at you. Even if you may feel like your world is out of control, you should know that you can count on so many caring people in your community to support you. No matter what you do, you will be safe and provided for.

 

While you were at the Women's Care Center, a counselor should have spoken with you and been your guide through the initial walk-in or appointment. We encourage you to ask this counselor any questions you may have, or talk to another counselor at the center that you feel comfortable speaking with. We trust Women's Care Center and your personal counselor to know just how to help you in your individual situation. They are trained professionals with a wealth of experience in helping women in situations similar to yours.

Women's Care Center also has experience working with students who have unplanned pregnancies, and will help you to plan effectively for your future. They will support you and help answer your questions about talking to your parents and/or boyfriend, getting medical care, finishing school, and seeking financial assistance.

If you are not in an area where you can find a Women's Care Center, we recommend you still call their hotline at 1(877) 908-2341 or email them. Their counselors can help you remotely or refer you to another center that can assist you confidentially and answer all of your questions.​

     3. Learn about your options in detail.

 

When you're speaking with your counselor, you need to educate yourself about the options you have. Your options at this point are raising your child (with the help of your community and/or family), giving your child up for adoption, or abortion. We encourage you to learn about all of these in detail, and make an educated decision. Remember—you have some time. Pregnancy lasts nine months and you don't have to decide your plans all at once. We encourage you to talk with your parents and the baby's father, but do not feel like you have to do what they would do in your shoes. This is your life and your child. If you have questions about anything you read about abortion, adoption, or raising your child, please reach out to us or the Women's Care Center.

     4. Connect with people who will be able to help you with the option you have chosen.

 

When you have made your decision, it's a good idea for you to contact people who have experience in the path you have chosen. Also, if you feel like an option you have chosen isn't what you want anymore, don't panic! You can change your mind up until the birth of your child, and in some cases, even after your baby is born.

The best resources for raising your child can be found at the Women's Care Center, and if you need a place to stay, we recommend you connect with Hannah's House.

If you are looking into adoption, we recommend you connect with Adoption Support Center.

If you are looking into abortion, we do not refer for abortions, but encourage you to learn about the processes and talk to your counselors at the Women's Care Center for more information (the Women's Care Center does not perform or refer for abortions, but they can give you accurate information on the procedures).

Before you choose abortion, you should know that abortion is harmful to women and their babies in physical, emotional, and long-term ways. You should be fully informed about abortion if it is something you're considering.

     5. Ask questions and voice your concerns.

If you have questions that you can't find answers to, or you're concerned about anything at all, don't keep it bottled up! Pregnancy is an incredible process, but it can be very difficult, even for mothers with planned pregnancies. Never forget that there are people who want to help you make educated and conscious decisions at every step of your journey.

Here is contact information that you can use should you ever have questions or concerns. We're always here for you!

St. Joseph County Right to Life: (574) 232-5433, life@prolifemichiana.org

Women's Care Center: 1(877) 908-2341, email here

 

I think someone I know is pregnant. What do I do?

If you know someone who you think might be facing an unplanned pregnancy, follow these steps to provide her with support.

     1. Approach her and ask if she wants to talk about anything or needs a confidant.

The first step is to ask if she wants to talk about things that are on her mind. Pregnancy can be incredibly intimidating, especially for a young person, and she may not be comfortable talking to you about it yet. The best way to care for someone who may be pregnant is to first let her know you are there for her.

If she doesn't want to talk about anything with you, reassure her that if she ever does, you are there for her. Give her your cell phone number so she can call or text you, or give her a way to contact you through social media. She may not be comfortable calling on the phone or talking in person, but may want to reach out through messaging or texting.

Whatever you do, do not pressure a woman into sharing things with you if you think she may be pregnant. She is already likely facing a great amount of stress, and you should be solely a voice of support.

If she does confide in you, speak calmly and reassuringly. Never nag her or make her feel as though she made a mistake. If the pregnancy was unplanned, she may already feel guilty or foolish. You should be supportive of her, not demeaning.

 

Tell her that you know this situation is difficult for her, but that she is strong enough to handle this unplanned pregnancy. If it seems appropriate in the situation, congratulate her on her pregnancy. Let her know you think she will be a great mom and make the best choices for her child's future, whether that be with her or not.

     2. Offer advice if she doesn't know what to do next.

Although she may be looking for a solution, she is initially looking for someone who can be on her side and someone whom she can trust. Let her know that if she needs advice or wants someone to bounce ideas off of, you're there for her.

 

If she does ask for your advice, you should suggest to her that she has a medical-grade pregnancy test to get the most accurate results about whether or not she is pregnant. The best local organization that offers these type of pregnancy tests is the Women's Care Center, which has locations in ten states and several locations in the Michiana area. Click here to find a Women's Care Center near you. Walk-ins are always welcome, or you can have her call 1(877) 908-2341 to schedule an appointment. If she feels uncomfortable calling, you can offer to call for her. You can also let her know that all resources at the center are free and completely confidential.

If she decides to go to the Women's Care Center, offer to go with her to give her support. She may not want you there, but it's always a good idea to let her know you're willing to accompany her if that would make things easier for her. If she can't get to a center by herself (maybe she doesn't have a car), offer to take her, ask if there is an adult she trusts to take her or both of you to the center, or feel free to call our office at (574) 232-5433 or email us at life@prolifemichiana.org so we can help you find a way to get to a center near you.

​​If you can't find a Women's Care Center near you, you can still encourage her or offer to call their hotline at 1(877) 908-2341 to speak to a counselor remotely and get information on another pregnancy resource center that can provide the care you need. Alternatively, you can contact the Women's Care Center via email or ask us for pregnancy resource center recommendations in your area.

     3. Continue to support her.
 

If her Women's Care Center pregnancy test confirmed that she was pregnant, she may not know what to do next. Let her know that you know she is strong enough to face anything that life throws at her. Let her know that many people in her community, including you, will help make sure she is safe and provided for.

 

While she was at the Women's Care Center, a counselor should have spoken to her and been her guide through the initial walk-in or appointment. Encourage her to ask this counselor any questions she may have, or talk to another counselor in the center that she feels comfortable speaking with. Her personal counselor is very experienced and will know just how to help her in her individual situation.

Let her know that the Women's Care Center has experience working with students who have unplanned pregnancies, and will help her to plan effectively for her future. They will support her, just like you will, and will help answer her questions about talking to her parents and/or boyfriend, getting medical care, finishing school, and seeking financial assistance.​

If you are not in an area where you can find a Women's Care Center, we recommend you have her call their hotline at 1(877) 908-2341 or email them. Their counselors can help her remotely or refer her to another center that can assist her confidentially and completely to answer all of her questions.​

If she is struggling to tell the news to her parents or boyfriend, offer to be there to support her when she tells them. Parents and partners can react in a myriad of different ways, and offering to be there may help her feel that she at least has one person on her side in this difficult time.

In some extreme cases, a woman facing an unplanned pregnancy may face being kicked out of her home by her parents, or being kicked out of a shared apartment by her boyfriend. If this is something that she may be facing, ask your parents if she could stay at your house, or if you live alone, offer to have her stay with you. If you can't offer your home as a place for her to stay, ask her if you can talk with some adults you trust and find a home for her to stay in. You can also ask if she would be comfortable talking to or having you talk to the women at Hannah's House, a local maternity home. If you still cannot find a place for her to live, feel free to contact our office for more options for her.

     4. Encourage her to learn about her options in detail.

 

Encourage her to educate herself about the options she has. Often, it's a good idea for her to consult with her Women's Care Center counselor about her options. If she doesn't have resources to help her learn about her options, you can give her information or let her know where to look. Her options at this point are raising her child (with the help of her community and/or family), giving her child up for adoption, or abortion.

 

We encourage you to learn about all of these in detail, help her learn about them all in detail, and help her make an educated decision that will benefit her and her child in the long term. Remember—she has some time. Pregnancy lasts nine months and she doesn't have to decide her plans all at once. Encourage her to talk with her parents and the baby's father to get their advice, but remind her that she does not have to do what they would do in her shoes. This is her life and her child. If she has questions about anything she reads or learns about abortion, adoption, or raising her child, encourage her to reach out to us or the Women's Care Center.

     5. Connect her with people who will be able to help her with the option she has chosen.

 

When she's made her decision, congratulate her and let her know that she's made the most educated decision she can and has chosen the path the works best for her and her child.

 

Now, it's a good idea for her to contact people who have experience in the path she's chosen. You can also reach out to these people for her. Also, remind her that if she feels like an option she's chosen isn't what she wants anymore, there's no reason to panic! She can change her mind up until the birth of her child, and in some cases, even after her baby is born.

The best resources for raising your child can be found at the Women's Care Center, where they offer classes, cribs, diapers, food, and many other resources for moms. If she needs a place to stay, connect with Hannah's House.

If she is looking into adoption, connect with Adoption Support Center

If she is looking into abortion, we do not refer for abortions. We encourage you to tell her the truth about what abortion does to her body and to her child, and encourage her to talk to her counselors at the Women's Care Center for more information (the Women's Care Center does not perform or refer for abortions, but they can give you accurate information on the procedures).

Let her know that abortion is harmful to women and their babies in physical, emotional, and long-term ways. She needs to be fully informed about abortion if it is something she is considering.

     6. Be there for her during pregnancy and after.

Continue to stand by her during her pregnancy and support her in any way she needs. Offer to take her to a maternity store to help her find clothes that fit her. Ask her if she has any food cravings and pick something up for her at the grocery store every once in a while. Offer to go with her to Ob-Gyn appointments or pregnancy/parenting classes. Ask her what she needs, and be willing to help her. If she is in school and is struggling, offer to help her with studying. If she has morning sickness and can't come to morning classes, offer to talk to the school counselor with her and determine a plan that will work for her. Let her know you are there for her and are trying your best to help her through every step of her pregnancy.

Offer ahead of time to wait in the hospital waiting room while she goes into labor, or ask if she would like it if you visited after the baby is born. Bring her a small gift after she gives birth, and consider bringing something for her baby, too.

If she decides to keep her baby, offer to babysit so she can work, do homework, sleep, or take care of herself for a few hours without having to worry about her child. Ask if you can bring her and her family meals. Don't be afraid to reach out to her and see what she is in need of. Doing small, helpful things without being asked is an extremely caring thing to do, but you can't read everything on her mind so don't hesitate to ask every now and then.

     7. Ask questions or voice concerns.

If you have questions that you can't find answers to, or you're concerned about anything at all during your friend's pregnancy, don't keep it bottled up! Pregnancy is an incredible process, but it can be very difficult, even for mothers with planned pregnancies. Never forget that there are people who want to help your friend make educated and conscious decisions at every step of her journey.

Here is contact information that you can use should you ever have questions or concerns. We and the Women's Care Center are always here to support people who need us!

St. Joseph County Right to Life: (574) 232-5433, life@prolifemichiana.org

Women's Care Center: 1(877) 908-2341, email here

 

I think I got my girlfriend pregnant. What do I do?

If you think you got your girlfriend or someone else pregnant, follow these steps.

     1. Approach her and ask if she wants to talk about anything.

The first step is to ask if she wants to talk about things that are on her mind. Pregnancy can be incredibly intimidating, especially for a young person, and she may not be comfortable talking to you about it yet, even though you may be very close to her. The best way to care for someone who may be pregnant is to first let her know you are there for her.

If she doesn't want to talk about anything with you, reassure her that if she ever does, you are there for her. Tell her to text you or call you if she needs anything.

Whatever you do, do not pressure your girlfriend into sharing. Both of you are likely already facing a great amount of stress, and you should be solely a voice of support and compassion. Making her feel pressured to share something when she is not ready to may make things harder on both of you.

If she does confide in you, speak calmly and reassuringly, even if you feel ashamed, guilty, or terrified. You are capable of helping your girlfriend in this situation that you both are possibly now in. Never nag her or make her feel as though she made a mistake. You should be supportive of her, not demeaning. You need to be a team with her. This pregnancy is your responsibility just as much as it is hers.

 

Tell her that you know this situation is difficult for her, and don't be afraid to share your own feelings in a calm way. Console her and let her know that you will be there with her through everything, and let her know that you and she are strong enough to handle this unplanned pregnancy. If it seems appropriate in the situation, congratulate her on her pregnancy. If you are excited that you may be a father, let her know that. Sharing positivity in a difficult situation can help her realize this pregnancy is not the end of the world. Let her know you think she will be a great mom and make the best choices for her child's future, whether that be with her or not.

     2. Offer advice if she doesn't know what to do next.

If she asks you what to do, or doesn't seem to have a plan of action, offer her support and ask if she would like your advice. Although she may be looking for a solution, she is initially looking for someone who can be on her side and someone whom she can trust. Don't offer advice unless she is open to it, or unless she is considering doing something that could injure her or her child before she has time to talk with professionals.

 

If she does ask for your advice, you should suggest to her that she has a medical-grade pregnancy test to get the most accurate results about whether or not she is pregnant. The best local organization that offers these type of pregnancy tests is the Women's Care Center, a crisis pregnancy resource center which has locations in ten states and several locations in the Michiana area. Click here to find a Women's Care Center near you. Walk-ins are always welcome, or you can have her call 1(877) 908-2341 to schedule an appointment. If she feels uncomfortable calling, you should offer to call for her. You can also let her know that all resources at the center are free and completely confidential, so she doesn't have to worry about finances or word getting out before she is ready to confide in others.

If she decides to go to the Women's Care Center, offer to go with her to give her support. She may not want you there, but it's always a good idea to ask. If she can't get to a center by herself, offer to take her, ask if there is an adult she trusts to take her or both of you to the center, or feel free to call our office at (574) 232-5433 or email us at life@prolifemichiana.org so we can help you find a way to get to a center near you.

​​If you can't find a Women's Care Center near you, you can still encourage her or offer to call their hotline at 1(877) 908-2341 to speak to a counselor remotely and get information on another pregnancy resource center that can provide the care you need. Alternatively, you can contact the Women's Care Center via email or ask us for pregnancy resource center recommendations in your area.

     3. Continue to support her.
 

If her Women's Care Center pregnancy test confirmed that she was pregnant, both of you may not know what to do next. Let her know that you know both of you are able to face anything that life throws at you, and that you will be by her side in this difficult time. Remind her that she is strong and capable. Let her know that many people in her community, including you, will help make sure she is safe and provided for.

 

While she was at the Women's Care Center, a counselor should have spoken to her and been her guide through the initial walk-in or appointment. Encourage her to ask this counselor any questions she may have, or talk to another counselor in the center that she feels comfortable speaking with. Her personal counselor is very experienced and will know just how to help her in her individual situation.

Let her know that the Women's Care Center has experience working with students who have unplanned pregnancies, and will help her to plan effectively for her future. They will support her, just like you will, and will help answer her questions about talking to her parents, getting medical care, finishing school, and seeking financial assistance.​

If you are not in an area where you can find a Women's Care Center, we recommend you have her call their hotline at 1(877) 908-2341 or email them. Their counselors can help her remotely or refer her to another center that can assist her confidentially and completely to answer all of her questions.​

If she is struggling to tell the news to her parents, offer to be there to support her when she tells them. Even though this can be very difficult for you, too, it is important to give her your utmost support. After all, this is just as much your child as it is hers, and she deserves to have you alongside her. Parents can react in a myriad of different ways, and having you there may help her feel that she at least has one person on her side who supports her.

In some extreme cases, a woman facing an unplanned pregnancy may face being kicked out of her home by her parents. If this is something that she may be facing ask her if you can talk with some adults you trust and find a home for her to stay in. You can also ask if she would be comfortable talking to or having you talk to the women at Hannah's House, a local maternity home. If you still cannot find a place for her to stay, feel free to contact our office for more options for her.

     4. Encourage her to learn about her options in detail.

 

Encourage her to educate herself about the options she has, and educate yourself as well. Although you do not have the ability to make the decision of what she does with your child, being educated on your girlfriend's options is a great way to support her and show her that you care and are trying to help her. Often, it's a good idea for her or both of you to consult with her Women's Care Center counselor about her options. If she doesn't have resources to help her learn about her options, you can give her information or let her know where to look. As a couple, your options at this point are raising your child (with your help and the help of her community and/or family), giving your child up for adoption, or abortion.

 

We encourage you to learn about all of these in detail, help her learn about them all in detail, and help her make an educated decision that will benefit her and the baby in the long term. Remember—she has some time. Pregnancy lasts nine months and she doesn't have to decide her plans all at once. Encourage her to talk with her parents to get their advice, but remind her that she does not have to do what they would do in her shoes. This is her life and her and your child. If she has questions about anything she reads or learns about abortion, adoption, or raising her child, encourage her to reach out to us or the Women's Care Center.

     5. Connect her with people who will be able to help her with the option she has chosen.

 

When she's made her decision, congratulate her and let her know that she's made the most educated decision she can and has chosen the path the works best for her, and for your baby.

 

Now, it's a good idea for her to contact people who have experience in the path she's chosen. You can also reach out to these people for her. Also, remind her that if she feels like an option she's chosen isn't what she wants anymore, there's no reason to panic! She can change her mind up until the birth of your child, and in some cases, even after your baby is born.

The best resources for raising your child can be found at the Women's Care Center, where they offer classes, cribs, diapers, food, and many other resources for moms. If your girlfriend needs a place to stay, connect with Hannah's House.

If she is looking into adoption, connect with Adoption Support Center

If she is looking into abortion, we do not refer for abortions. We encourage you to tell her the truth about what abortion does to her body and to her child, and encourage her to talk to her counselors at the Women's Care Center for more information about the truth of abortion (the Women's Care Center does not perform or refer for abortions, but they can give you accurate information on the procedures). Fight for your child's right to live and remind her that your baby is a genetically complete human being with its own life to live, too.

Let her know that abortion is harmful to women and their babies in physical, emotional, and long-term ways. She needs to be fully informed about abortion if it is something she is considering.

     6. Be there for her during pregnancy and after.

Continue to stand by her during her pregnancy and support her in any way she needs. Offer to take her to a maternity store to help her find clothes that fit her. Ask her if she has any food cravings and pick something up for her at the grocery store every once in a while. Offer to go with her to Ob-Gyn appointments or pregnancy/parenting classes. Ask her what she needs, and be willing to help her. If she is in school and is struggling, offer to help her. If she has morning sickness and can't come to morning classes, offer to talk to the school counselor with her and determine a plan that will work for her. Let her know you are there for her and are trying your best to help her through every step of her pregnancy.

Offer ahead of time to wait in the hospital waiting room while she goes into labor, or ask if she would like it if you visited after the baby is born. Bring her a small gift after she gives birth, and consider bringing something for your baby, too.

If she decides to keep the baby, offer to take care of your child whenever she wants you to. Even if you and she are no longer dating, it is important to support her and your child. Taking care of the baby so she can work, do homework, sleep, or take care of herself for a few hours without having to worry about your baby is a great way to help care for your child, as well as being the father your child deserves. Ask if you can bring meals for your girlfriend (and her family). Don't be afraid to reach out to her and see what she is in need of. Doing small, helpful things without being asked is very caring, but you can't read everything on her mind so don't hesitate to ask every now and then.

     7. Ask questions or voice concerns.

If you have questions that you can't find answers to, or you're concerned about anything at all during your girlfriend's pregnancy, don't keep it bottled up! Pregnancy is an incredible process, but it can be very difficult, even for mothers with planned pregnancies. Never forget that there are people who want to help you and your girlfriend make educated and conscious decisions at every step of her journey.

Here is contact information that you can use should you ever have questions or concerns. We and the Women's Care Center are always here to support people who need us!

St. Joseph County Right to Life: (574) 232-5433, life@prolifemichiana.org

Women's Care Center: 1(877) 908-2341, email here

 

What is abortion?

If you or someone you know is facing an unplanned pregnancy, one option on your or their mind may be ​abortion. Abortion is a very controversial issue in our day and age, and you may have some opinions about it already. Even if you have strong opinions about abortion, we encourage you to read below and learn more about what abortion is and what abortion does.

     1. Abortion is the deliberate termination of a human pregnancy.

There are two different kinds of abortion.

 

Involuntary abortion, most commonly known as miscarriage, is not intentional and happens for reasons beyond human control. This is not the type of abortion that is such a major issue in our country.

 

Almost exclusively, when the topic of abortion is discussed, people are instead referring to voluntary abortion. These abortions are the deliberate termination of a human pregnancy, brought about by a process or procedure that goes against the natural design of a woman's body and the natural pregnancy process.

 

Keep this in mind as you read more about abortion: the abortion process purposely ends the life of the human in the womb.

     2. Why do a lot of people think abortion is wrong?

     3. What is the abortion process like?

There are several ways that abortions are performed. Read on to learn about the steps in each type of abortion, or watch these brief videos, made by an abortionist, who walks through each kind of procedure.

D&E Abortion

A dilation (dilatation) and evacuation abortion, D&E, is a surgical abortion procedure during which an abortionist first dilates the woman’s cervix and then uses instruments to dismember and extract the baby from the uterus. The D&E abortion procedure is usually performed between thirteen and twenty-four weeks LMP (that is thirteen to twenty-four weeks after the first day of the woman’s last menstrual period).

How is a D&E abortion performed?​​

To prepare for a D&E abortion, the abortionist uses laminaria, a form of sterilized seaweed, to open the woman’s cervix 24 to 48 hours before the procedure. The laminaria soaks up liquid from the woman’s body and expands, widening (i.e., dilating) the cervix.

When the woman returns to the abortion clinic, the abortionist may administer anesthesia and further open the cervix using metal dilators and a speculum. The abortionist inserts a large suction catheter into the uterus and turns it on, emptying the amniotic fluid.

After the amniotic fluid is removed, the abortionist uses a sopher clamp — a grasping instrument with rows of sharp “teeth” — to grasp and pull the baby’s arms and legs, tearing the limbs from the child’s body. The abortionist continues to grasp intestines, spine, heart, lungs, and any other limbs or body parts. The most difficult part of the procedure is usually finding, grasping and crushing the baby’s head. After removing pieces of the child’s skull, the abortionist uses a curette to scrape the uterus and remove the placenta and any remaining parts of the baby.

 

The abortionist then collects all of the baby’s parts and reassembles them to make sure there are two arms, two legs, and that all of the pieces have been removed.

How developed is the child when this abortion would typically be performed?

D&E abortions are performed on women who are anywhere between thirteen and twenty-four weeks pregnant. Here is some information about fetal development at the ages of thirteen to twenty-four weeks LMP (since the first day of the mother's last menstrual period).

Week 13: At week thirteen LMP, the preborn baby’s fingerprints are visible, and the child’s organs are visible through his or her thin skin. The baby is roughly three inches long during this stage of pregnancy.

Week 16: At week sixteen LMP, the child’s toenails begin to form, and his or her face and limbs are much more developed. The baby’s heart is pumping roughly 25 quarts of blood every day, and will continue as the child develops in the womb. Many mothers feel the baby move by this point in the pregnancy.

Week 20: At twenty weeks LMP, the child’s nervous system is developed enough to feel pain. Research by the University of Toronto shows that babies at this stage can feel pain in the womb — even with greater intensity than adults. Almost all mothers feel the baby move by this point in pregnancy.

Week 24: At twenty-four weeks LMP, the baby is roughly a foot long, and his or her brain is developing rapidly. The child’s lungs are also developing into their branch-like structure. At this age, almost all babies can survive outside the mother if given proper support.

Aspiration Abortion

A suction or aspiration D&C (dilation and curettage) is a procedure in which a suction catheter is inserted into the mother’s uterus to extract the preborn baby. The abortionist then scrapes the lining of the uterus to remove any remaining parts. This first trimester procedure is typically performed between five and thirteen weeks LMP (after the first day of the woman’s last menstrual period).

How is an aspiration (suction) D&C abortion performed?

A suction, or aspiration, D&C abortion is performed in-clinic. Prior to the abortion, the woman should receive an exam that includes an ultrasound in order to confirm that she is pregnant and diagnose any complicating factors, such as a tubal, or ectopic, pregnancy.

An abortionist uses metal rods or medication to dilate the woman’s cervix and gain access to the uterus, where the baby resides. The abortionist then inserts a suction catheter to vacuum the child from the womb. The suction machine has a force approximately 10 to 20 times the force of a household vacuum cleaner.

 

The procedure is completed as the abortionist uses a sharp metal device called a curette to empty the remains of the child from the mother’s uterus.

A follow up exam and ultrasound can be performed to help minimize the risk of incomplete abortion.

How developed is the child when this abortion would typically be performed?

Aspiration (suction) D&C abortions are performed on women who are anywhere between five and thirteen weeks pregnant. Here is some information about fetal development at the ages of five to thirteen weeks LMP (since the first day of the mother's last menstrual period).

Weeks 4-5: During this stage of pregnancy, the preborn child is developing rapidly. At four to five weeks LMP — that is, four to five weeks since the first day of the mother’s last period, and just two to three weeks following fertilization (conception) — the baby’s organs start to develop, and the heart begins to beat. These developmental milestones often take place before the mother even knows she is pregnant.

Week 8: At eight weeks LMP, the preborn baby’s hands and feet are developing, and the neural pathways in the baby’s brain start to form. The child is constantly moving in the uterus, although the mother cannot feel it.

Week 9: By nine weeks LMP, the child can suck its thumb, open and close its jaw, stretch, and sigh. The baby’s teeth begin to form and the heart completes dividing into four chambers.

Week 10: At week ten LMP, the child’s vital organs have developed and start to function. The baby is rapidly moving in the uterus, and tiny nails begin to form on the child’s hands and feet.

Week 12: At twelve weeks LMP, the child develops reflexes, and can open and close fingers, respond to touch, and make movements with his or her mouth. The child’s nerve cells are developing rapidly.

Abortion Pills

A medical (or chemical) abortion is a non-surgical form of abortion in which the woman takes pills containing Mifepristone (RU-486) and Misoprostol (or Cytotec) to end the life of the baby. This procedure is performed during the first trimester of pregnancy. The drugs are approved by the FDA for use up to ten weeks since the first day of her last menstrual period (LMP).

How is a chemical/medical abortion via abortion pills performed?

The woman visits an abortion clinic or doctor’s office and ingests pills containing Mifepristone (also known as RU-486) at the clinic.

This drug blocks the action of the hormone called “progesterone,” which is naturally produced by the mother’s body to enable the mother to sustain and nourish the pregnancy.

When RU-486 blocks progesterone, the lining of the mother’s uterus breaks down, cutting off blood and nourishment to the baby, who then dies inside the mother’s womb.

Twenty-four to forty-eight hours later, the woman ingests another drug called Misoprostol (also called Cytotec), administered orally or vaginally, which causes contractions and bleeding to expel the baby from the womb.

How developed is the child when this abortion would typically be performed?

Medical abortions via abortion pills are performed on women who are up to ten weeks pregnant. Here is some information about fetal development up to the ages of ten weeks LMP (since the first day of the mother's last menstrual period).

Weeks 4-5: During this stage of pregnancy, the preborn child is developing rapidly. At four to five weeks LMP — that is, four to five weeks since the first day of the mother’s last period, and just two to three weeks following fertilization (conception) — the baby’s organs start to develop, and the heart begins to beat. These developmental milestones often take place before the mother even knows she is pregnant.

Week 8: At eight weeks LMP, the preborn baby’s hands and feet are developing, and the neural pathways in the baby’s brain start to form. The child is constantly moving in the uterus, although the mother cannot feel it.

Week 9: By nine weeks LMP, the child can suck its thumb, open and close its jaw, stretch, and sigh. The baby’s teeth begin to form and the heart completes dividing into four chambers.

If you have taken RU-486 and have changed your mind about abortion, there may still be time to reverse the process. Call 1(877) 558-0333 or visit abortionpillreversal.com for more information now.

Induction Abortion

A third trimester induction abortion is performed at 25 weeks LMP until just before birth. At 25 weeks, a baby is almost fully-developed and is considered viable, meaning he or she could survive outside the womb. For this reason, the abortionist will usually first kill the baby in utero by injecting a substance that causes cardiac arrest, and induces the mother’s labor to deliver her baby stillborn.

How is an induction abortion performed?

Day 1: To help ensure the baby will be delivered dead and not alive, the abortionist uses a large needle to inject digoxin or potassium chloride through the woman’s abdomen or vagina, targeting the baby’s heart, torso, or head.

When the digoxin takes effect, the lethal dose causes a fatal cardiac arrest, and the baby’s life will end. (Even if the needle misses the baby, digoxin can still kill the baby when released into the amniotic sack, but will usually take longer to kill the child.)

During the same visit, the abortionist inserts multiple laminaria sticks, or sterilized seaweed, to open up the woman’s cervix.

Day 2: The abortionist replaces the laminaria and may perform a second ultrasound to ensure that the baby is dead. If the child is still alive, the abortionist administers a second lethal dose of digoxin or potassium chloride. During this visit, the abortionist may administer labor-inducing drugs.

The woman goes back to where she is staying while her cervix continues to dilate. The woman will usually wait a period of two to four days for her cervix to dilate enough for her to deliver the dead baby.

Day 3 or 4: The woman returns to the clinic to deliver her dead baby. If she goes into labor before she can make it to the abortion clinic in time, she will deliver her baby at home or in a hotel room. During this time, a woman may be advised to sit on a bathroom toilet until the abortionist arrives. If she can make it to the clinic, she will do so during her most heavy and severe contractions and deliver the dead baby.

If the child does not come out whole, the procedure becomes a D&E, or a dilation and evacuation. The abortionist uses clamps and forceps to dismember and remove the baby piece by piece.

How developed is the child when this abortion would typically be performed?

At 25 weeks, a preborn child is fully developed and considered viable — that is, with proper medical care and attention, he or she would be able to survive outside of the womb.

Week 25: At twenty-five weeks LMP, the baby’s hair continues to grow, and the color and texture can be discerned. At this stage, the child is around 13 ½ inches long, from the baby’s head to its heels.

Week 27: At twenty-seven weeks LMP, the preborn baby weighs almost two pounds. The child’s brain tissue continues to develop, and the baby is sleeping and waking in regular cycles. The mother may even feel the child hiccup at this stage, which may become more common as the pregnancy progresses.

Week 31: At thirty-one weeks LMP, the baby can turn his or her head to the side, and is very active in the womb. The baby kicks and does somersaults, and develops more fat underneath the skin.

     4. Does abortion hurt? Are there any side effects or medical issues related with it?

 

Abortion does usually hurt, and not just in immediate physical ways. It can have impacts on physical and mental health, even sometimes long term effects. It can increase the risk of a woman being suicidal, having problems conceiving children later in life, and in some cases, abortion can even cause death.

 

Abortion has also been known to impact any future or current siblings of the aborted baby, a husband or boyfriend, parents, and relationships or marriages. For more information, please visit the Abortion Hurts section of our website which covers many ways that abortion can effect a woman's life and her future, as well as those of people close to the woman.​

If she is struggling to tell the news to her parents, offer to be there to support her when she tells them. Even though this can be very difficult for you, too, it is important to give her your utmost support. After all, this is just as much your child as it is hers, and she deserves to have you alongside her. Parents can react in a myriad of different ways, and having you there may help her feel that she at least has one person on her side who supports her.

In some extreme cases, a woman facing an unplanned pregnancy may face being kicked out of her home by her parents. If this is something that she may be facing ask her if you can talk with some adults you trust and find a home for her to stay in. You can also ask if she would be comfortable talking to or having you talk to the women at Hannah's House, a local maternity home. If you still cannot find a place for her to stay, feel free to contact our office for more options for her.

     5. Encourage her to learn about her options in detail.

 

Encourage her to educate herself about the options she has, and educate yourself as well. Although you do not have the ability to make the decision of what she does with your child, being educated on your girlfriend's options is a great way to support her and show her that you care and are trying to help her. Often, it's a good idea for her or both of you to consult with her Women's Care Center counselor about her options. If she doesn't have resources to help her learn about her options, you can give her information or let her know where to look. As a couple, your options at this point are raising your child (with your help and the help of her community and/or family), giving your child up for adoption, or abortion.

 

We encourage you to learn about all of these in detail, help her learn about them all in detail, and help her make an educated decision that will benefit her and the baby in the long term. Remember—she has some time. Pregnancy lasts nine months and she doesn't have to decide her plans all at once. Encourage her to talk with her parents to get their advice, but remind her that she does not have to do what they would do in her shoes. This is her life and her and your child. If she has questions about anything she reads or learns about abortion, adoption, or raising her child, encourage her to reach out to us or the Women's Care Center.

St. Joseph County Right to Life: (574) 232-5433, life@prolifemichiana.org

Women's Care Center: 1(877) 908-2341, email here

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©2018 St. Joseph County Right to Life, Inc.